2012 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 16,000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 4 Film Festivals

Click here to see the complete report.

The tinnitus I hear – all the time

I just came across some sound-samples that simulate my own tinnitus. I wanted to share them, so perhaps people around me better understand why I am tired or unable to participate in social activities.

  1. This is similar to the "quiet" tinnitus that I have all the time 24/7 
    (I can barely hear this sounds when I listen to it, so I guess it’s pretty close to my own)
  2. Also barely audible to me, meaning it’s similar to my own
  3. Whistling sound
  4. This one is totally inaudible to me, meaning that I have this as tinnitus for sure…
  5. Screeching
  6. I also have “white noise” kind of tinnitus, but all the examples I have found are too high i frequency, so “white noise” with deeper frequency is another example (you just hafve to imagine the sound)
  7. All these above combined, and you might have a sense of the cacophony that is in my head at all times…

tinnitus

The only time I don’t have tinnitus, is when I am so preoccupied with something else that I “forget” it, or when I sleep.

Tinnitus get’s worse (more loud and more “present”, harder to ignore) when I have slept bad, or when I am getting more tired or sick like with a flu.

Why do I have tinnitus, even with CI’s?

I have been thinking back, trying to get a clue as to the reason why my CI-operations didn’t “solve” or remedy the tinnitus problem, and have worked out this theory:

from bad comes goodFrom around 2000 and onward, I cranked up the sound volume on my hearing aids every time I had a control or new hearing aid or simply needed adjustments. The result of this cranking up? I walked around with an aproximate loudness of 100 dB to 120 dB and more for 10 years! This might have resulted in the development of recruitment (norsk), hyperacusis (norsk), even more hearingloss (aka more rapidly deterioriating hearing) and tinnitus.

Furthermore my theory is that all these years of unusual loud sounds coming from my hearing aid, resulted in my brain (the parts receiving and processing the electric nerveimpulses of sound) underwent some structural change or that my sensorineural system developed some kind of damage. I am not a neurologist or expert in any medical field, so these are a laymans theories…

I feel that the health services in my country failed in providing adequate help to me in a reasonable time-frame. Maybe I could have been without the tinnitus, had I been helped 5 years earlier… I’m not bitter, I just want others to learn from what happend to me. And to prevent others to have to deal with the same things, if it’s avoidable…

Going deaf – twice

beethoven-777x934In many ways, the process I have been in after the second operation has been about accepting that I am nowin fact deaf. Yes, I can hear with the CI, but I can’t use them (to hear) all day. In fact, two – three hours per day is my present maximum dose of sound. I have to learn to live a large part of my life as a deaf person. Also it’s not just me, but my family has to learn to have a deaf person around them too.

Learning sign-language at Ål – School for deaf

pMy wife has identified the need for us all to learn sign-language. I have been too stubborn to realize it or initiate it. At the same time I have always been open to it, thinking that refuting something that might actually help, just because I don’t want to be deaf, is a counterproductive thing to do. So I am open to it, and we actually went to our first week of school, for the whole family, to learn sign language just a few weeks ago.

It was an eyeopening experience, and we will learn to sign in our family.

Nedsatt hørsel? Sliten? Kurstilbud

Nasjonalt senter for hørsel og psykisk helse arrangerer mestringskurs for deg med nedsatt hørsel. Oppstart januar 2013.

Nedsatt hørsel innebærer for mange en kontinuerlig kompenseringsinnsats. Du må kompensere mentalt for den informasjonen du mister, du kompenserer for muskulære anstrengelser i nakke og skulder, for nedsatt balanse, du bruker energi på å lokalisere hvor lyder kommer fra osv. Stress og følelse av utmattelse forekommer ofte i kjølvannet av nedsatt hørsel.

I forbindelse med doktorgradsprosjektet “Mestring av psykososialt stress ved hørselstap” har vi utarbeidet en kurspakke basert på kognitiv terapi og erfaringer vi har samlet fra hørselshemmede gjennom studien.

Dersom du er interessert, nysgjerrig på dette kurset – eller kjenner noen kurset kunne være aktuelt for, nærmere informasjon:
Sidsel Haaberg, tlf. 22 92 35 02/951 57 782
Maj Volden, tlf. 916 20 315
Jenny Meling Hansen, tlf. 941 54 472

Kurset koster egenandel (for tiden 307,-) pr. samling – opp til frikortsgrensen.

Se for øvrig: her.

My new crusade – raise awareness about noise

Communications is by far mostly verbal. Aside from the visual aspects (screen image, video/film, body language etc.), information is mostly spread verbally/auditory. Think about how much information exchange that takes place verbally in these arenas: education, court system, politics, entertainment, family, parties and so on and so on.

The last year or so I have engaged in voluntarily work, such as sitting on boards for the housing cooperative in my community (where I live) and for HLF Oslo (hearing association in Oslo, a subgroup of the national HLF) much like the HLAA.

On the HLF Oslo board I have been designated a role much like a CCO or PRO, in a political aspect, that is. A political interests spokesperson for HLF Oslo. Now, I admit, I have a lot to learn (which is part of why I want to do this Smilefjes  ). One of the issues we are talking about working on is noise.

One aspect that is amazingly neglected in these aforementioned venues of auditory communication is acoustic noise. (it is amazing when you think of it, really! It takes very little resources, and the gains would be HUGE!)

Please take a little time to look at this, it explains it so well:

Why architects need to use their ears

See «Hearing… but not as you know it» on YouTube

Hearing Loss Linked to Three-Fold Risk of Falling – 02/27/2012

More bass, more!

Was at appointment at hospital today. Time to give my Bionic hearing some sound adjustments.
Before I arrived at appointment I thought that there was no need to adjust anything. My speech comprehension is good, and the left ear is coming along nicely, slowly catching up with my right, steadily getting better and better “resolution”.
At first we discussed other related issues concerning my general wellbeing, and eventually, as I had time to think, or dawned on me: what is my biggest problem these says? Answer: the voice of my father-in-law and very thin women/Childrens voices.
Since I can’t improve both aspects at the same time, the choice fell on my father-in-law.
We boosted the bass, given that his voice is a deep one. I used my new smartphone to play a Rolling Stones classic to determine the right level of the bass boost. “I can’t get no satisfaction” is a simplistic rock’n roll tune that has song that is easy to catch. Therefore it is a good reference to use while determining the right amount of adjustment.
We ended up with doing the same adjustment on both sides, thus keeping both sides’ identically programmed.
I must say I’m surprised at how much better all sounds sound now! Even after all this time, there’s room for big improvements with just small adjustments!
I can’t wait to hear my father-in-law’s voice again, to see of the adjustments I made will make a difference. Luckily we’re bound to spend some time with my in-laws this summer.
Will my daughter’s crying be easier or harder to tolerate? Will my wife’s voice be more tolerable for me when I’m at my worst condition (tired, worn out, tinnitus and migraine raging).
And what about the music? I have lately felt that the music sounded a little anemic. This might be just what the doctor ordered  😛