Sudoku vs. cognition

What in the world could the term Cognition have to do with Sudoku? Well, let me explain…

For a Sudoku to be solved, you need to be able to learn, reason and remember numbers. Most of which has to do with the term “cognition” (click the word above for a precise terminology).

I learned about my own cognitive condition from doing a lot of Sudoku the past years. For instance I learned that having poor sleeping over longer periods made my Sudoku solving ability very poor. Also if I was plainly tired from a long day, my Sudoku skills suffered. Other things that made Sudoku hard for me to solve was the (for the time being) ever present fatigue, tinnitus and level of blood sugar.

After I became quite skilled in Sudoku, I recognized variations in my own mental performance. And soon it became apparent to me that my mental performance also followed certain patterns. And this is the interesting part that made me want to share this with my readers.

Sudoku taught me when I was tired in a time where I was always tired, if that makes sense??? It’s the fatigue-thing I’m talking about… How did THAT help me? Well, there was variations of tiredness over time. Some days I just couldn’t remember from 5 minutes earlier, or I had trouble concentrating on the task at hand (I have a special routine for solving them). And since I was all about getting better, noticing the good or bad days for Sudoku gave me an external method of measurement of my mental state in a period where my own built-in sensor needed calibration, so to speak 🙂

Sudoku taught me how to trust and USE my own sense of tiredness again. The feeling of tiredness is a signal to ourselves to slow down, to take a break, to eat and drink, to sleep or take a nap and so on…

Yes, I was truly f***ed up, I had lost the ability to heed the signals my own body and mind gave me… Sudoku helped me almost in a scientific way to regain that.

I continue to do Sudoku, allthough not as much as I used to, but it is still a fine tool for measuring my own cognitive skills. And I can recommend Sudoku to everyone as mental training. It has been and continues to be useful to me, not only as a tool for mental measurement but also as hobby that trains my cognitive skills somewhat… And we all could do with better brains, right?

Advertisements

4 Responses to “Sudoku vs. cognition”

  1. thisisapracticeblog Says:

    It sounds like you already have a good brain! I could use a better brain. Maybe I should try soduko. It’s looks so intimidating.. . .and I’m tired too. (yaaawn)

  2. big dream Says:

    My husband is becoming a very expert at it! He does it every day. I have no patience with sudoku! Just the easy ones.

  3. Jennifer Says:

    I wish I had a little more patience for sudoku! I have a very short attention span and have a terrible time concentrating!!

  4. theo1965 Says:

    my attention span is surrently short too – the job suxx! ;-(


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: