The sum of 2007 – Happy New Year!

As 2007 soon is history, I feel it is appropriate for me to sum it all up for myself.

Even though my hearing is coming to an end, there are, however, sounds to look forward to. And that is the CI-sound! Still have to wait for it, but in the meantime, I can take care of myself and prepare myself as best as I can.

The year 2007 gave me many good things:

  • I started really believing in a better life for myself.
  • I learned A LOT about myself and life in general.
  • I’m much more self-confident in my role as a father to my beloved son.  
  • I consolidated my relationship to my great, great super girlfriend. Thanks for being in my life, honey!!!
  • I had the opportunity to spend time with my girlfriend 😉
  • I learned a lot more about CI, and I’m even more certain that it is what I need.
  • My health improved a lot from reduced stress.
  • I did a fair share of traveling and had a lot of activities. I’ve been busy, all right 🙂
  • This blog has become a good thing for me, I also made new online-friends from it 🙂
  • I discovered that my knee(s) probably need surgery so I can exercise again. (too much pain lately). It’s a good time to fix such stuff now, as I’m waiting for CI anyway 🙂 Just hope I don’t have to wait too long for the knees to be fixed either…
  • I made a lot of new acquaintances in the CI-community, for which I am grateful…
  • My life seems to fall into place now, as opposed to a little more than one year ago, where I felt everything fell apart…
  • Took care of my eyesight (new lenses and new glasses)
  • Relationship with family improved overall.
  • I learned to cope with my tinnitus, it’s almost soothing sometimes
  • I’m reading books on a steady basis again! For many years I have been so tired/fatigued that my ability to concentrate was very poor. I used to be an avid reader of everything, and now I’m on my way back 🙂
  • I’m sleeping well again.

The year 2007 gave me a few downturns too:

  • CI surgery is still in the blue as for a fixed date
  • The music’s over for now. I get no more pleasure from it (only occasional glimpses), only more fatigue and “head/earaches” 😦 
  • Speaking of fatigue; my battery is still worn these days, it takes long time to charge and very short time to empty… But it has improved a little, and that is to me good news, really! I feel the tide turned in 2007.
  • Trouble walking stairs both up and down, thus disabling me to exercise rigorously, which was supposed to have been my project number one this year (in preparation to CI-surgery). Even swimming was painful… Will be fixed soon I hope…
  • The tinnitus became a factor that I had to deal with. It is slowly increasing in force (louder and louder), but luckily it’s a steady tone, rather than the chaotic concert it was at first…. It’s more prone to appear when I’m tired, so it’s a signal for me too, to slow down or turn off my hearing aids for a break…

All in all, 2007 was a good year for me. Happy New Year, everyone!!!

Advertisements

Making sense of the world through a cochlear implant

PET20YEAROLD_HIGH March 13, 2007 –  Scientists at University College London and Imperial College London have shown how the brain makes sense of speech in a noisy environment, such as a pub or in a crowd. The research suggests that various regions of the brain work together to make sense of what it hears, but that when the speech is completely incomprehensible, the brain appears to give up trying.

The study was intended to simulate the everyday experience of people who rely on cochlear implants, a surgically-implanted electronic device that can help provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or who has severe hearing problems.

Using MRI scans of the brain, the researchers identified the importance of one particular region, the angular gyrus, in decoding distorted sentences. The findings are published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

In an ordinary setting, where background noise is minimal and a person’s speech is clear, it is mainly the left and right temporal lobes that are involved in interpreting speech. However, the researchers have found that when hearing is impaired by background noise, other regions of the brain are engaged, such as the angular gyrus, the area of the brain also responsible for verbal working memory – but only when the sentence is predictable.

“In a noisy environment, when we hear speech that appears to be predictable, it seems that more regions of the brain are engaged,” explains Dr Jonas Obleser, who did the research whilst based at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience (ICN), UCL. “We believe this is because the brain stores the sentence in short-term memory. Here it juggles the different interpretations of what it has heard until the result fits in with the context of the conversation.”

brainxrayThe researchers hope that by understanding how the brain interprets distorted speech, they will be able to improve the experience of people with cochlear implants, which can distort speech and have a high homer-simpson-wallpaper-brain-1024level of background noise.

“The idea behind the study was to simulate the experience of having a cochlear implant, where speech can sound like a very distorted, harsh whisper,” says Professor Sophie Scott, a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow at the ICN. “Further down the line, we hope to study variation in the hearing of people with implants – why is it that some people do better at understanding speech than others. We hope that this will help inform speech and hearing therapy in the future.” 

A Christmas wishlist for any CI-candidate

All these books would be nice to sift through….

Also I found that a medical journal published 6 times a year by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, called “Ear and Hearing”. They have plenty of very interesting online articles available to subscribers, abridged if youre a guest…

Same publishing house offers The Laryngoscope.

All this is a bit expensive for me at the moment, but I will keep searching….

If any of my readers have tips for websites or publications concerning CI, please let me know, I will collect and publish everything I come across…
For the time being I will focus on what interests me spesifically;

  • simultaneous bilateral vs unilateral CI,
  • CI in adults and
  • all research data and latest scientific breakthroughs…

Cold on cold winters day

Still suffering from that common cold I reported on a few days back, I feel it takes forever to recover. I’m an impatient guy who hates to be slowed down. But I guess the years have given me at least a little more of that precious patience. When I grew up i was prone to get ear-infections and had more than my fair share of common cold and alike.
This time it has been a while since last round so I notice things more vividly. I am even more baffled by the impact the clogged sinuses and all other symptoms have on my hearing. Talking in a controlled environment is harder, thus giving me even more strain by communicating. Being in noisy environment communicating is virtually impossible.

I have become quite obsessed these last years about dressing myself properly to avoid getting cooled down and thus more vulnerable to catch a cold os something similar. I make sure to stay warm on feet, head and neck as good as I can. I can sense when I get bugs in my body, and mostly I feel I’m able to beat it down before I get sick. It takes a few hours sleep and a lot of heated beverage like milk with honey in it 🙂

Sometimes I wonder if I’m developing paranoia for illness, or if I’m a hypochondric…

Speaking of hypochondria, I remember when I was young I was often accused of being hypochondric, because I complained a lot. In retrospect I can understand that, and at the same time, I understand my own behaviour. What I didn’t understand was how I was affected when I had a cold. And being young and utterly impatient the feeling of increased isolation and deafness wasn’t easy to deal with.
Over the years I have slowly come to terms with all the issues concerning my state of hearing, and I have also developed this “smartness” in avoiding getting sick. I’m quicker to sense when the air is getting colder on the evening in the late summertime/beginning of fall. I know my own body better and treat it with more respect than ever before.

ist2_2899227_welness_massage_stonesI do exercises on a daily basis to prevent back and neck-pains. I have gone a few rounds with my physician, and have been able to determine that my right knee has a injury to it that needs closer attention. I guess I’m simply more bodily aware than ever before, and that is a good thing, because I need to optimize (compensate) for the secondary impacts of my near deafness on my body.

For example, my back pains originate in the fact that I use my neck to protrude my head when I have trouble hearing (you know; putting my ear out to signal that I do not hear properrly). Over the years that have resulted in a neck that does not harmonize, thus straining my back further down, causing secondary symptoms.

A course with a psychomotoric therapist and advices from my girlfriend has taught me this.

The exercises I do now really feel beneficial to me. Amount of back pain is reduced to almost nothing. Headaches caused by stiff neck and stress is reduced. All because I won’t stop trying to figure things out….

Link to Spine-Health, about common cold and hypochondria

In sickness and health

Coming from a lot of resting and relatively no stress I can feel somewhat energized. But the feeling of fatigue is less than one hour away still, and that can be frustrating. But I have come to terms with the fact that this is how it is – for now anyway. And I feel that I’m getting better a little at a time. I hope it’s not just wish-thinking…..

Yesterday I came down with a regular cold. Comes with the season, and especially when you have kids roaming in germ factories like schools.

All hearing aid users probably know this: being hard of hearing makes you a extra deaf when being “stuffed” and having to blow your nose every ten minutes or so… But for people who do not know how it is to be hard of hearing and use hearing aids, it’s virtually impossible to understand the impact of a common cold on hearing aids users. This is what I want to try and explain now.

When common cold occurs, one is likely to get an increase in internal pressure in the neck/throat region due to various swollen glands. This in turn puts pressure on internal organs in the head, hence headaches, light-sensitivity and REDUCED HEARING. When the cochlear has more internal fatigue-736871pressure where the hair-cells are situated, the gel-substance that carries the sound waves to the hair-cells is a little less sensitive. That means that the overall amount of energy that reaches the hair-cells in cochlear is being reduced.

Then there’s also the impact of all the fluids that forms in the sinuses.
With reduced hearing in the first place, such an reduction on the hearing gives a larger effect on hard of hearing, thus making us more deaf.

Aside from the normal symptoms of common cold that makes you tired, feverish and so on, it also makes near deaf’s have to put even more energy into the business of communicating.

I propose that near deaf need an extra low threshold for sickness leave from work etc. It is also important that the employer understand the fact that common cold has a stronger impact of people with hearing disability.

Technorati Tags: ,,,,,,,